Frugal Maniac  - Where Cheap Does Not Have to Mean Inadequate!
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

DIY Bubble Bath
The best fresh DIY salsa recipe
Scrub Garage Sale
Clearance Baby
Slow Down where is the Beef? #recipe

Most Popular Posts

Make your own Old School Toothpaste
#DIY Makeup Remover + Moisturizer
Hot Oil Hair Treatment
Repair Archery Targets
Pick a good Mask! #automotive

Categories

4WD
Announcements
Apples
Around the home
Auto Body Repair
Automotive
Avon
Baby
Bath
Beef Recipes
Bread
Breakfast
Cajun Recipes
Cake recipes
Camping
Casserole/Hot Dish
Chicken
Clearance up to 90% off!
Clothing
Cookies
Couponing
Creams and Moisturezers
Deals
Department Store Coupons
Desert Recipies
diabetic Recipies
Dip
Dips
DIY
DIY perfume
Dogs
Eggless
Eggs
Face Care
Facebook
Fish Recipies
Fishing
Freebies
Frugal cleaning tips
Frugal Living
Frugal pet ideas
Fruit
Garage Sale
Garden
Grilling
Hair
Hamburger
Holiday Dinner Recipes
Hunting
Ice Cream
Jam & Jelly
Kids
Lamb Recipes
Lips
Money saving tips for Fishing
Money Saving Tips For Hunting and Fishing
Motivational
Nails
Newsletter
Oils
Pancake Recipes
Pasta
Personal Care Frugal style
Pork Recipes
Recipes
Recipes for 1
Recipes for 2
Rice
Salad Recipes
Salsa
Sausauge Recipes
Slow Cooker
Survival Gear
Survival Tips
Survival Videos
Teeth
Tips to help you save money
Toners
Toys
Vegetable Recipes
Venison Recipes
Video Games
Wild game Recipes
Wrinkle Cream
powered by

Frugal Maniac Blog

How to avoid Ticks


protecting you from wood ticks when you go outdoors frugal but a must do and chemical free tick guard

frugal living tips for the outdoors, frugal living tips when I go outside, frugal living tick guard

CLICK HERE for more #survival and #outdoor tips!
Avoiding Ticks
When we go outdoors we use duct tape to seal our pant legs and sleeves.  Taping the ends of pant legs at shoes, sleeves at the wrist area will limit tick entrance points. We then will take a little bit of our homemade tick spray (16oz spray bottle of water with a 10ml of tea tree oil) and spray all clothing, focusing on the ankles. Doing these few little tricks will help to avoid ticks and keep the ticks from finding their favorite food. You! So use the duct tape and spray, it helps put  the Ticks on a no you diet.

Avoid Disease

With all of the Tick borne diseases that have been popping up over the last decade the importance of avoiding all of these disgusting little blood suckers has become important. One of these transferable diseases is Lyme disease, this nasty little sickness mimics Multiple Sclerosis, which I have and may I say MS sucks and anything that acts like it. The awesome thing about the medical advancements that we currently have available to us today Lyme Disease can be treated. It is a good thing some of the symptoms are weakness, headaches, body aches, even lesions on the brain. The CDC says that there are at least 16 different things that a tick can transmit to you, what revolting little bugs. It all depends on the area of the U.S. you are in.

What are Ticks

Tick, (suborder Ixodida), any of about 825 species of invertebrates in the order Parasitiformes (subclass Acari). Ticks are important parasites of large wild and domestic animals and are also significant as carriers of serious diseases. Although no species is primarily a human parasite, some occasionally attack humans. Hard ticks, such as the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), attach to their hosts and feed continuously on blood for several days during each life stage. When an adult female has obtained a blood meal, she mates, drops from the host, and finds a suitable site where she lays her eggs in a mass and dies. Six-legged larvae hatch from the eggs, move up on blades of grass, and wait for a suitable host (usually a mammal) to pass by. The odor of butyric acid, emanated by all mammals, stimulates the larvae to drop onto and attach to a host. After filling themselves with the host’s blood, the larvae detach and molt, becoming eight-legged nymphs. Nymphs also wait for, and board, a suitable host in the same way as larvae. After they have found a host and engorged themselves, they also fall off, and then they molt into adult males or females. Adults may wait for a host for as long as three years. Most hard ticks live in fields and woods, but a few, such as the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus), are household pests. Soft ticks differ from hard ticks by feeding intermittently, laying several batches of eggs, passing through several nymphal stages, and carrying on their developmental cycles in the home or nest of the host rather than in fields. Hard ticks damage the host by drawing large amounts of blood, by secreting neurotoxins (nerve poisons) that sometimes produce paralysis or death, and by transmitting diseases, including Lyme diseaseTexas cattle fever, anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain spotted feverQ fevertularemiahemorrhagic fever, Powassan virus disease, and a form of encephalitis. Soft ticks also are carriers of diseases. Adults range in size up to 30 mm (slightly more than 1 inch), but most species are 15 mm or less. They may be distinguished from their close relatives, the mites, by the presence of a sensory pit (Haller’s organ) on the end segment of the first of four pairs of legs. Eyes may be present or absent. This group has a worldwide distribution, and all species are assigned to three families: Argasidae, comprising the soft ticks, and Nuttalliellidae and Ixodidae, together comprising the hard ticks. The family Nuttalliellidae is represented by one rare African species.

Never Avoid Nature

We recommend taking every chance that gets presented to spend time outdoors. Fishing, hunting, camping, it does not matter, if there’s a chance to be outside take it. The fresh air is worth every second! The advantages of being outside are as follows:

1. Your vitamin D levels will go up

Vitamin D is called the sunshine vitamin because sunlight hitting the skin begins the circuitous process — the liver and kidneys get involved — that eventually leads to the creation of the biologically active form of the vitamin. Over all, research is showing that many vitamins, while necessary, don't have such great disease-fighting powers, but vitamin D may prove to be the exception. Epidemiologic studies are suggesting it may have protective effects against everything from osteoporosis to cancer to depression to heart attacks and stroke. Even by conventional standards, many Americans don't have enough vitamin D circulating in their bodies. The good news is that you'll make all the vitamin D you need if you get outside a few times a week during these summer days and expose your arms and legs for 10 to 15 minutes. Of course, it has to be sunny out.
There are some snags. Vitamin D production is affected by age (people ages 65 and over generate about a fourth as much as people in their 20s) and skin color (African Americans have, on average, about half the levels of vitamin D in their blood as white Americans).
Another problem: sunscreens are most effective at blocking the ultraviolet B (UVB) light, the part of the spectrum that causes sunburn, but UVB also happens to be the kind of light that kick-starts the generation of vitamin D in the skin.
The either-or of sunscreen and sunshine vitamin has stirred up a lot of controversy and debate between pro-sunscreen dermatologists and the vitamin D camp. But there is plenty of middle ground here: some limited sun exposure on short walks and the like, supplemented with vitamin D pills if necessary, and liberal use of sunscreen when you are out for extended periods, particularly during the middle of the day.

2. You'll get more exercise (especially if you're a child)

You don't need to be outside to be active: millions of people exercise indoors in gyms or at home on treadmills and elliptical trainers. Nor is being outside a guarantee of activity. At the beach on a summer day most people are in various angles of repose.
Still, there's no question that indoor living is associated with being sedentary, particularly for children, while being outdoors is associated with activity. According to some surveys, American children spend an average of 6 hours a day with electronic media (video games, television, and so on), time that is spent mainly indoors and sitting down. British researchers used Global Positioning System devices and accelerometers, which sense movement, to track the activity of 1,000 children. They found that the children were more than doubly active when they were outside.
Adults can go to the gym. Many prefer the controlled environment there. But if you make getting outside a goal, that should mean less time in front of the television and computer and more time walking, biking, gardening, cleaning up the yard, and doing other things that put the body in motion.

3. You'll be happier (especially if your exercise is 'green')

Light tends to elevate people's mood, and unless you live in a glass house or are using a light box to treat seasonal affective disorder, there's usually more light available outside than in. Physical activity has been shown to relax and cheer people up, so if being outside replaces inactive pursuits with active ones, it might also mean more smiles and laughter.
Researchers at the University of Essex in England are advancing the notion that exercising in the presence of nature has added benefit, particularly for mental health. Their investigations into "green exercise," as they are calling it, dovetails with research showing benefits from living in proximity to green, open spaces.
In 2010 the English scientists reported results from a meta-analysis of their own studies that showed just five minutes of green exercise resulted in improvements in self-esteem and mood.
Mind you, none of the studies were randomized controlled trials. The intuitive appeal of green exercise is its strength, not the methodological rigor of the research supporting it. It's hard to imagine how a stroll in a pretty park wouldn't make us feel better than a walk in a drab setting.

4. Your concentration will improve

Richard Louv coined the term "nature-deficit disorder" in his 2008 book Last Child in the Woods. It's a play on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Researchers have, in fact, reported that children with ADHD seem to focus better after being outdoors. A study published in 2008 found that children with ADHD scored higher on a test of concentration after a walk through a park than after a walk through a residential neighborhood or downtown area. Other ADHD studies have also suggested that outdoor exercise could have positive effects on the condition. Truth be told, this research has been done in children, so it's a stretch to say it applies to adults, even those who have an ADHD diagnosis. But if you have trouble concentrating — as many do — you might see if some outdoor activity, the greener the better, helps.

5. You may heal faster

University of Pittsburgh researchers reported in 2005 that spinal surgery patients experienced less pain and stress and took fewer pain medications during their recoveries if they were exposed to natural light. An older study showed that the view out the window (trees vs. a brick wall) had an effect on patient recovery. Of course, windows and views are different than actually being outside, but we're betting that adding a little fresh air to the equation couldn't hurt and might help.

Last thoughts

With ticks potentially waiting around for some succulent piece of meat to latch onto so they can become their puffy grayish selves. Can you say ick!  When you are outdoors and in nature trying to avoid ticks it is always a good idea to be on the defense, defending yourself and taking every opportunity to avoid ticks from ever getting a chance to get close and personal. It is so important having a tick guard, it really is a must with all of the tick borne diseases that have come around lately. No one wants to get sick just because of going outside. The bonus of this frugal living outdoors tip is that it is chemical free and saves money.
 
Citation:
Tickborne diseases of the United States | CDC. (2020, January 9). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/index.html
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. “Tick.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 14 Feb. 2020, www.britannica.com/animal/tick.
Harvard Health Publishing. (2019, September 24). A prescription for better health: go alfresco. Harvard Health. https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/a-prescription-for-better-health-go-alfresco
Lyme disease. (n.d.). Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/Lyme-disease
multiple sclerosis | Diagnosis, Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment. (n.d.). Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/multiple-sclerosis




0 Comments to How to avoid Ticks:

Comments RSS

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint